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    Validity of prepartum changes in vaginal and rectal temperature to predict calving in dairy cows (2011)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Burfeind, O.
    Suthar, V. S.
    Voigtsberger, R.
    Bonk, S.
    Heuwieser, W.
    Quelle
    Journal of Dairy Science; 94(10) — S. 5053–5061
    ISSN: 0022-0302
    Sprache
    Englisch
    Verweise
    URL (Volltext): http://edocs.fu-berlin.de/docs/receive/FUDOCS_document_000000020274
    DOI: 10.3168/jds.2011-4484
    Pubmed: 21943756
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    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    The prevalence of dystocia is high in many dairy herds and is associated with stillbirth and negative effects for the cow. An accurate predictor of calving would enable supervision of cows more precisely to a relevant time interval so that obstetrical assistance can be provided in a timely manner. This might help to decrease calf mortality rate. Evidence exists that cows exhibit a decrease in body temperature before the onset of calving. The performance of a decrease in body temperature as a test to predict the onset of calving in dairy cows has not been investigated. The objective was to investigate test criteria of a decrease in vaginal and rectal temperature as predictors of calving in dairy cows. In 3 experiments, temperature loggers (Minilog 8, Vemco Ltd., Halifax, Canada) were inserted into the vagina of cows before calving (n = 85), and rectal temperatures were measured twice daily in 55 of these cows. Vaginal temperatures were 0.2 to 0.3 °C and 0.6 to 0.7 °C lower on the day of calving compared with 24 and 48 h before calving, respectively. Rectal temperatures were 0.3 to 0.5 °C and 0.4 to 0.6 °C lower on the day of calving compared with 24 and 48 h before calving, respectively. Vaginal temperatures exhibited a diurnal rhythm during the 120 h before calving, which continued on a lower level during the 48 h preceding parturition. In the 3 experiments, a decrease in vaginal temperature of ≥ 0.3 °C over 24h could predict calving within 24h, with sensitivity ranging from 62 to 71% and specificity ranging from 81 to 87%. Similarly, a decrease in rectal temperature measured at 0730 h of ≥ 0.3 °C could predict calving within 24h, with sensitivity from 44 to 69% and specificity from 86 to 88%. Although dairy cows exhibit a distinctive decrease in vaginal and rectal temperatures commencing approximately 48 h before calving, detecting this decrease does not determine the onset of calving precisely. Nevertheless, it can provide valuable information in addition to the traditional signs (i.e., relaxation of the sacrosciatic ligament) that calving is imminent.