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    Application of laser postionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry/time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry in nanotoxicology: visualization of nanosilver in human macrophages and cellular responses (2011)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Haase, Andrea
    Arlinghaus, Heinrich F
    Tentschert, Jutta
    Jungnickel, Harald
    Graf, Philipp
    Mantion, Alexandre
    Draude, Felix
    Galla, Sebastian
    Plendl, Johanna (WE 1)
    Goetz, Mario E
    Masic, Admir
    Meier, Wolfgang
    Thünemann, Andreas F
    Taubert, Andreas
    Luch, Andreas
    Quelle
    ACS nano; 5(4) — S. 3059–68
    ISSN: 1936-0851
    Sprache
    Englisch
    Verweise
    DOI: 10.1021/nn200163w
    Pubmed: 21456612
    Kontakt
    Institut für Veterinär-Anatomie

    Koserstr. 20
    14195 Berlin
    +49 30 838 53555
    anatomie@vetmed.fu-berlin.de

    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are the subject of worldwide commercialization because of their antimicrobial effects. Yet only little data on their mode of action exist. Further, only few techniques allow for visualization and quantification of unlabeled nanoparticles inside cells. To study SNP of different sizes and coatings within human macrophages, we introduce a novel laser postionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (Laser-SNMS) approach and prove this method superior to the widely applied confocal Raman and transmission electron microscopy. With time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) we further demonstrate characteristic fingerprints in the lipid pattern of the cellular membrane indicative of oxidative stress and membrane fluidity changes. Increases of protein carbonyl and heme oxygenase-1 levels in treated cells confirm the presence of oxidative stress biochemically. Intriguingly, affected phagocytosis reveals as highly sensitive end point of SNP-mediated adversity in macrophages. The cellular responses monitored are hierarchically linked, but follow individual kinetics and are partially reversible.