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    Control of Lyme borreliosis and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases (2018)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Sprong, Hein
    Azagi, Tal
    Hoornstra, Dieuwertje
    Nijhof, Ard M (WE 13)
    Knorr, Sarah (WE 13)
    Baarsma, M Ewoud
    Hovius, Joppe W
    Forschungsprojekt
    Anti-tick vaccines to prevent tick-borne diseases in Europe
    Quelle
    Parasites & Vectors; 11(1) — S. 145
    ISSN: 1756-3305
    Sprache
    Englisch
    Verweise
    DOI: 10.1186/s13071-018-2744-5
    Pubmed: 29510749
    Kontakt
    Institut für Parasitologie und Tropenveterinärmedizin

    Robert-von-Ostertag-Str. 7-13
    Gebäude 35, 22, 23
    14163 Berlin
    Tel.+49 30 838 62310 Fax.+49 30 838 62323
    email:parasitologie@vetmed.fu-berlin.de

    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases (TBDs) are diseases that emerge from interactions of humans and domestic animals with infected ticks in nature. Nature, environmental and health policies at (inter)national and local levels affect the risk, disease burden and costs of TBDs. Knowledge on ticks, their pathogens and the diseases they cause have been increasing, and resulted in the discovery of a diversity of control options, which often are not highly effective on their own. Control strategies involving concerted actions from human and animal health sectors as well as from nature managers have not been formulated, let alone implemented. Control of TBDs asks for a "health in all policies" approach, both at the (inter)national level, but also at local levels. For example, wildlife protection and creating urban green spaces are important for animal and human well-being, but may increase the risk of TBDs. In contrast, culling or fencing out deer decreases the risk for TBDs under specific conditions, but may have adverse effects on biodiversity or may be societally unacceptable. Therefore, in the end, nature and health workers together must carry out tailor-made control options for the control of TBDs for humans and animals, with minimal effects on the environment. In that regard, multidisciplinary approaches in environmental, but also medical settings are needed. To facilitate this, communication and collaboration between experts from different fields, which may include patient representatives, should be promoted.