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    Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae strains isolated from horses are a genetically distinct population within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae taxon (2016)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Pinho, Marcos D
    Erol, Erdal
    Ribeiro-Gonçalves, Bruno
    Mendes, Catarina I
    Carriço, João A
    Matos, Sandra C
    Preziuso, Silvia
    Luebke-Becker, Antina (WE 7)
    Wieler, Lothar H
    Melo-Cristino, Jose
    Ramirez, Mario
    Quelle
    Scientific reports; 6 — S. 31736
    ISSN: 2045-2322
    Sprache
    Englisch
    Verweise
    DOI: 10.1038/srep31736
    Pubmed: 27530432
    Kontakt
    Institut für Mikrobiologie und Tierseuchen

    Robert-von-Ostertag-Str. 7-13
    Gebäude 35
    14163 Berlin
    Tel.+49 30 83 8-518 40/518 43 Fax.+49 30 838 45 18 51
    email:mikrobiologie@vetmed.fu-berlin.de

    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    The pathogenic role of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae in the equine host is increasingly recognized. A collection of 108 Lancefield group C (n = 96) or L (n = 12) horse isolates recovered in the United States and in three European countries presented multilocus sequence typing (MLST) alleles, sequence types and emm types (only 56% of the isolates could be emm typed) that were, with few exceptions, distinct from those previously found in human Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Characterization of a subset of horse isolates by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that most equine isolates could also be differentiated from S. dysgalactiae strains from other animal species, supporting the existence of a horse specific genomovar. Draft genome information confirms the distinctiveness of the horse genomovar and indicates the presence of potentially horse-specific virulence factors. While this genomovar represents most of the isolates recovered from horses, a smaller MLST and MLSA defined sub-population seems to be able to cause infections in horses, other animals and humans, indicating that transmission between hosts of strains belonging to this group may occur.