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    Prevalence of mcr-1 in E. coli from Livestock and Food in Germany, 2010-2015 (2016)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Irrgang, Alexandra
    Roschanski, Nicole (WE 10)
    Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois
    Grobbel, Mirjam
    Skladnikiewicz-Ziemer, Tanja
    Thomas, Katharina
    Roesler, Uwe (WE 10)
    Käsbohrer, Annemarie
    Forschungsprojekt
    „Verbreitung von ESBL-/AmpC-bildenden Enterobakterien entlang der gesamten Masthähnchenkette: Schwachstellenanalyse und Bestimmung von Interventionspunkten“
    Quelle
    PLoS one; 11(7) — S. e0159863
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    Sprache
    Englisch
    Verweise
    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159863
    Pubmed: 27454527
    Kontakt
    Institut für Tier- und Umwelthygiene

    Robert-von-Ostertag-Str. 7-13
    Gebäude 35
    14169 Berlin
    Tel.+49 30 8385 1845 Fax.+49 30 83845 1863
    email:tierhygiene@vetmed.fu-berlin.de

    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    Since the first description of a plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) in November 2015 multiple reports of mcr-1 positive isolates indicate a worldwide spread of this newly discovered resistance gene in Enterobacteriaceae. Although the occurrence of mcr-1 positive isolates of livestock, food, environment and human origin is well documented only few systematic studies on the prevalence of mcr-1 are available yet. Here, comprehensive data on the prevalence of mcr-1 in German livestock and food isolates are presented. Over 10.600 E. coli isolates from the national monitoring on zoonotic agents from the years 2010-2015 were screened for phenotypic colistin resistance (MIC value >2 mg/l). Of those, 505 resistant isolates were screened with a newly developed TaqMan-based real-time PCR for the presence of the mcr-1 gene. In total 402 isolates (79.8% of colistin resistant isolates) harboured the mcr-1 gene. The prevalence was depending on the food production chain. The highest prevalence was detected in the turkey food chain (10.7%), followed by broilers (5.6%). A low prevalence was determined in pigs, veal calves and laying hens. The mcr-1 was not detected in beef cattle, beef and dairy products in all years investigated. In conclusion, TaqMan based real-time PCR provides a fast and accurate tool for detection of mcr-1 gene. The overall detection rate of 3.8% for mcr-1 among all E. coli isolates tested is due to high prevalence of mcr-1 in poultry production chains. More epidemiological studies of other European countries are urgently needed to assess German prevalence data.