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    CD4 T Lymphocyte-mediated Lung Disease:
    Steady State between Pathological and Tolerogenic Immune Reactions (2004)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Bruder, Dunja
    Westendorf, Astrid M
    Geffers, Robert
    Gruber, Achim D (WE 12)
    Gereke, Marcus
    Enelow, Richard I
    Buer, Jan
    Quelle
    American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine; 170(11) — S. 1145–1152
    ISSN: 0003-0805
    Sprache
    Englisch
    Verweise
    Pubmed: 15306530
    Kontakt
    Institut für Tierpathologie

    Robert-von-Ostertag-Str. 15
    Gebäude 12
    14163 Berlin
    Tel.+49 30 838 62450 Fax.+49 30 838 62522

    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    Although considerable evidence indicates a role for CD4(+) T lymphocytes (T cells) in airway inflammation, little data exist regarding the mechanisms underlying the induction and regulation of CD4(+) T cell reactivity to lung-specific antigens. To dissect the immunologic and molecular mechanisms of CD4(+) T cell dysregulation, reactivity to a self-antigen expressed in the lung of mice bearing a major histocompatibility complex class-II-restricted T cell receptor specific for this antigen was studied. Transgenic mice developed a progressive interstitial pneumonitis characterized by massive lymphocytic and plasmacytic infiltration of interalveolar septa, a clinical picture closely resembling some of the interstitial lung diseases. Pulmonary inflammation reached a plateau state in older mice with prominent formation of lymphoid follicles but reduced interstitial infiltration. Extensive immunologic characterization of self-reactive CD4(+) T cells isolated from the inflamed lung suggested the induction of regulatory T cells in the site of inflammation. Moreover, inflammation was accompanied by broad changes in the gene expression pattern toward a profile partially resembling that of activated, but strikingly, also that of regulatory CD4(+) T cells. Together our data provide important insights into functional and molecular alterations being associated with the induction and/or regulation of T cell-mediated pulmonary inflammation.