Fachbereich Veterinärmedizin



    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) of human and avian origin belonging to sequence type complex 95 (STC95) portray indistinguishable virulence features (2014)

    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Nandanwar, Nishant (WE 7)
    Janssen, Traute (WE 7)
    Kühl, Michael
    Ahmed, Niyaz
    Ewers, Christa
    Wieler, Lothar H (WE 7)
    International journal of medical microbiology; 304(7) — S. 835–842
    ISSN: 1438-4221
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ijmm.2014.06.009
    Pubmed: 25037925
    Institut für Mikrobiologie und Tierseuchen

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    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains of certain genetic lineages are frequently implicated in a wide range of diseases in humans and birds. ExPEC strains belonging to the phylogenetic lineage/sequence type complex 95 (STC95) are one such prominent lineage that is commonly isolated from extraintestinal infections such as systemic disease in poultry and urinary tract infections (UTIs), neonatal meningitis and sepsis in humans. Several epidemiological studies have indicated that ST95 strains obtained from such infections may share similar virulence genes and other genomic features. However, data on their ability to establish infections in vivo as deduced from the manifestation of similar virulence phenotypes remain elusive. In the present study, 116 STC95 ExPEC isolates comprising 55 human and 61 avian strains, possessing similar virulence gene patterns, were characterized in vitro using adhesion, invasion, biofilm formation and serum bactericidal assays. Overall, STC95 strains from both groups, namely human and birds, were equally capable of adhering to and invading the two mammalian kidney cell lines. Similarly, these strains were able to form strong biofilms in M63 medium. Furthermore, they were equally resistant to the bactericidal activity of human and avian serum. Our cumulative data reinforce the understanding that ST95 strains from poultry present a potential zoonotic risk and therefore need a One Health strategy for a successfull intervention.