Fachbereich Veterinärmedizin


Service-Navigation

    Publikationsdatenbank

    Comparable high rates of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in birds of prey from Germany and Mongolia (2012)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Guenther, Sebastian
    Aschenbrenner, Katja
    Stamm, Ivonne
    Bethe, Astrid
    Semmler, Torsten
    Stubbe, Annegret
    Stubbe, Michael
    Batsajkhan, Nyamsuren
    Glupczynski, Youri
    Wieler, Lothar H
    Ewers, Christa
    Quelle
    PLoS one; 7(12) — S. e53039
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    Sprache
    Englisch
    Verweise
    URL (Volltext): http://edocs.fu-berlin.de/docs/receive/FUDOCS_document_000000015883
    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053039
    Pubmed: 23300857
    Kontakt
    Institut für Mikrobiologie und Tierseuchen

    Robert-von-Ostertag-Str. 7-13
    Gebäude 35
    14163 Berlin
    +49 30 838 51840 / 51843
    mikrobiologie@vetmed.fu-berlin.de

    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    Frequent contact with human waste and liquid manure from intensive livestock breeding, and the increased loads of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that result, are believed to be responsible for the high carriage rates of ESBL-producing E. coli found in birds of prey (raptors) in Central Europe. To test this hypothesis against the influence of avian migration, we initiated a comparative analysis of faecal samples from wild birds found in Saxony-Anhalt in Germany and the Gobi-Desert in Mongolia, regions of dissimilar human and livestock population characteristics and agricultural practices. We sampled a total of 281 wild birds, mostly raptors with primarily north-to-south migration routes. We determined antimicrobial resistance, focusing on ESBL production, and unravelled the phylogenetic and clonal relatedness of identified ESBL-producing E. coli isolates using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and macrorestriction analyses. Surprisingly, the overall carriage rates (approximately 5%) and the proportion of ESBL-producers among E. coli (Germany: 13.8%, Mongolia: 10.8%) were similar in both regions. Whereas bla(CTX-M-1) predominated among German isolates (100%), bla(CTX-M-9) was the most prevalent in Mongolian isolates (75%). We identified sequence types (STs) that are well known in human and veterinary clinical ESBL-producing E. coli (ST12, ST117, ST167, ST648) and observed clonal relatedness between a Mongolian avian ESBL-E. coli (ST167) and a clinical isolate of the same ST that originated in a hospitalised patient in Europe. Our data suggest the influence of avian migratory species in the transmission of ESBL-producing E. coli and challenge the prevailing assumption that reducing human influence alone invariably leads to lower rates of antimicrobial resistance.