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    Intrahost evolutionary dynamics of canine influenza virus in naive and partially immune dogs (2010)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Hoelzer, Karin
    Murcia, Pablo R
    Baillie, Gregory J
    Wood, James L N
    Metzger, Stephan M
    Osterrieder, Nikolaus
    Dubovi, Edward J
    Holmes, Edward C
    Parrish, Colin R
    Quelle
    Journal of virology; 84(10) — S. 5329–5335
    ISSN: 0022-538x
    Sprache
    Englisch
    Verweise
    DOI: 10.1128/JVI.02469-09
    Pubmed: 20219907
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    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    The patterns and dynamics of evolution in acutely infecting viruses within individual hosts are largely unknown. To this end, we investigated the intrahost variation of canine influenza virus (CIV) during the course of experimental infections in naïve and partially immune dogs and in naturally infected dogs. Tracing sequence diversity in the gene encoding domain 1 of the hemagglutinin (HA1) protein over the time course of infection provided information on the patterns and processes of intrahost viral evolution and revealed some of the effects of partial host immunity. Viral populations sampled on any given day were generally characterized by mean pairwise genetic diversities between 0.1 and 0.2% and by mutational spectra that changed considerably on different days. Some observed mutations may have affected antigenicity or host range, including reversions of CIV host-associated mutations. Patterns of sequence diversity differed between naïve and vaccinated dogs, with some presumably antigenic mutations transiently reaching high frequency in the latter. CIV populations are therefore characterized by the rapid generation and clearance of genetic diversity. Potentially advantageous mutations arise readily during the course of single infections and may give rise to antigenic escape or host range variants.