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    Der künstliche Hüftgelenksersatz beim Hund:
    eine retrospektive Studie an der Klinik und Poliklinik für kleine Haustiere der Freien Universität Berlin in den Jahren 1993-1998 (2002)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Perslow, M. B.
    Kaiser, S.
    Grußendorf, C.
    Burger, M.
    Staszyk, C.
    Waibl, H.
    Brunnberg, L.
    Quelle
    Kleintier-Praxis; 47 — S. 157–171
    ISSN: 0023-2076
    Kontakt
    Klinik für kleine Haustiere

    Oertzenweg 19 b
    Haus 1
    14163 Berlin
    +49 30 838 62356
    kleintierklinik@vetmed.fu-berlin.de

    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    154 artificial hip joints (type Richards Canine II) have been implanted in 136 small animal patients. The main indication observed was chronic hip pain due to osteoarthritic changes secondary to hip dysplasia (96.1%); whereas, other degenerative or traumatic diseases of the hip joint were seldom. Within an observation period from one month to 4 years (O1.6 years), 147 hip joints were clinically evaluated; of these, 114 were radiologically evaluated. Results show that 89.8% of the examined dogs were free of lameness on the operated limb, whereas only 6.8% showed occasional stiffness or temporary lameness after long periods of rest or exercise; 3.4% were permanently lame. Radiographs of the pelvis, immediately taken after the operation, showed that 74.0% of the joint cavities presented a correct position; whereas, 2.6 and 23.4% showed a dorsally open and ventrally open position in the sagittal plane. In regard with misplaced joint cavities, the risk of dislocation was increased. Although the central position of the diaphyseal prosthesis was not achieved in all cases, most of the dogs remained clinically without physical discomfort. The position of the collar of the prosthesis the escape of cement into the pelvis or the cement filling did not seem to have any influence on the clinical development. Thus, changes observed through radiological examinations did not inevitably result in clinical discomfort. There were 28 cases with complications after total hip replacement. Dislocations occurred (n=8) most frequently, followed by aseptic loosenings of the implants (n=7) and infections (n=5). By the appropriate treatment, good function could be restored in 16 of these cases.