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    Literaturübersicht zur Ösophagusstriktur mit Darstellung der Ballondilatation bei zwei Hunden und einer Katze (2003)

    Art
    Zeitschriftenartikel / wissenschaftlicher Beitrag
    Autoren
    Linden, T.
    Kohn, B.
    Quelle
    Kleintier-Praxis; 48(6) — S. 337–344
    ISSN: 0023-2076
    Kontakt
    Klinik für kleine Haustiere

    Oertzenweg 19 b
    Haus 1
    14163 Berlin
    +49 30 838 62356
    kleintierklinik@vetmed.fu-berlin.de

    Abstract / Zusammenfassung

    There are several case studies of endoscopic balloon dilation of oesophageal strictures reported in the veterinary literature (including 48 dogs, 25 cats). Stricture formation was associated with a recent anesthetic episode in 62% of the cases, other suspected causes were oesophageal foreign bodies (11%), vomiting (8%), doxycyclin or clindamycin administration (4%), congenital (3%), trauma (1%), oesophageal feeding tube (1%) and an episode of cardiovascular collapse (1%). In 8% of the cases stricture formation was unexplained. The interval between anesthesia or foreign body removal and initiation of clinical signs ranged from 1-32 days. Regurgitation was the most common clinical sign. Some animals had several strictures (94 strictures were identified in 73 animals): 19% were located in the cervical oesophagus, 33% in the mid-esophagus, and 48% in the distal oesophagus. In 34 out of 50 patients several (2-8) dilation procedures were necessary, the interval between dilations ranged from 2-51 days. The most common complication was mucosal tearing with hemorrhage (75%), followed by oesophageal perforation (5,5%), aspiration pneumonia (4%) and diverticula formation (3%). Postdilational therapy consisted of administration of H2 receptor antagonists, sucralfate, metoclopramide and prednisolone in most animals. A successful outcome occurred in 15% of the patients which were able to eat canned or dry food without regurgitation, 51% could eat only canned food and 16% mashed food. One dog required a permanent gastric tube. Ten patients (14%) died or were euthanized due to complications of the stricture